Tuesday, 12 June 2018

Special Economic Zone: Myth and Reality - Supongtemsu Longchar, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science





As a Special Economic Zone, can Nagaland upgrade its existing infrastructure to not only utilize to its maximum capacity, but at the same time attract industries other than agro based tapping into the reserve of the demographic dividend coupled with central government focus on skill India? Is Nagaland ready to emerge as a hub for industries to use as their base of production?






"Special Economic Zone: Myth and Reality"



Export Processing Zones (EPZs) are an international phenomenon influencing increasing share of trade flows and employing a growing number of workers. In 1986, there were 176 zones across 47 countries; by 2003, the number had increased to over 3,000 across 116 countries. Over the past few years, the policy of promoting zones has found favor with the government of India as well. In 2000, the government replaced the old EPZ regime by a new scheme of “Special Economic Zones” (SEZs) with several lucrative incentives/benefits that were not available in the earlier scheme. In 2005, it enacted the SEZ Act and the SEZ Rules were notified in February 2006.The policy is expected to give a big push to exports, employment and investment in SEZs.

The ministry of commerce claims that these zones are expected to attract investment of about Rs.1,00,000 Cr including FDI of Rs. 25,000 Cr and create additional 5,00,000 direct jobs, by December 2007. These claims notwithstanding, the policy has come under heavy criticism. Dissenters contend that the policy would be misused for real estate development rather than for generating exports. Concerns have also been expressed on the displacement of farmers by land acquisition, loss of fertile agricultural land, a huge revenue loss to the exchequer and adverse consequences of uneven growth. The promotion of SEZs is an attempt to deal with infrastructural deficiencies, procedural complexities, bureaucratic hassles and barriers raised by monetary, trade, fiscal, taxation, tariff and labor policies. These structural bottlenecks affect the investment climate adversely by increasing production and transaction costs. Since country-wide development of infrastructure is expensive and implementation of structural reforms would require time, due to given socio-economic and political institutions, the establishment of industrial enclaves (SEZs/EPZs) is seen as an important strategic tool for expediting the process of industrialization in the countries. The zones offer numerous benefits such as,
(i) Tax incentives,
(ii) Provision of standard factories/plots at low rents with extended lease period,
(iii) Provision of infrastructure and utilities,
(iv) Single window clearance,
(v) Simplified procedures, 
(vi) Exemptions from various restrictions that characterise the investment climate in the domestic economy.
These benefits foster a conducive business environment to attract local and foreign investment, which would not otherwise have been forthcoming. The competitive advantages of zones may also be explained within the framework of the “cluster approach”. Zones are industrial clusters where external economies of scale and other advantages help the operating firms in reducing costs, developing competitive production systems and attracting investment, in particular, FDI. As a result of these benefits, many developing countries have been promoting zones with the expectation that they will provide the engine of growth to propel industrialization. There is, however, no conclusive evidence regarding the role of the zones in the development process of a country. While some countries have been able to capture the dynamic and static gains from zone operations, many others have not. In that context, it is important to analyze the Indian experience.

Indian Experience

A micro level analysis of the zones’ contribution to industrialization efforts in India reveals that EPZs have had a catalytic effect in promoting new production sectors, exporting new products and in building up the country’s image in certain products in international markets. The foundation of the modern jewelry industry in India, for instance, was laid in SEEPZ in Mumbai in 1987-88. It was there that the “wax setting technique” was introduced in jewelry production, which made mass scale production possible and dramatically transformed the labor-intensive jewelry industry from its cottage industry status into a highly mechanized modern industry. SEZs accounted for over 55 per cent of total Indian jewelry exports in 2002-03. SEZs have also been instrumental in creating the base for the growth of the electronics industry through technology transfers, spill over and demonstration effects. Until the early 1980s, electronic hardware exports were primarily originating from EPZs. Even during 2000-02, the share of SEZs in total hardware exports was only 26 per cent. The Indian software saga also really began in SEEPZ, Mumbai. The first major breakthrough in India’s software exports came in 1977 when the Tatas established a unit in SEEPZ in partnership with Burroughs, an American company, to export software and peripherals. This activity drew attention to the possibilities available for offshore software development in India. Soon after, Texas Instruments and Hewlett-Packard established subsidiaries in Bangalore, in 1986 and 1989, respectively and the rest is history.

The success stories notwithstanding, the economic contribution of SEZs remained minuscule at the national level. Though India was the first Asian country to take the free zone initiative and set up the first zone in Kandla as early as in 1965. The share of SEZs in exports was a mere 5 percent in 2004-05. Furthermore, they accounted for only 1 percent of factory sector employment and 0.32 percent of factory investment in the same year. Although they have had a positive impact on regional employment and human development by creating economic opportunities, especially for those without high levels of schooling, their potential in contributing to human development has not been fully exploited due to their failure in attracting investment and promoting economic activities in the region. With the approval of the Agro and food processing special economic zone, AFSEZ, Ganeshnagar, Dimapur vide No.F.1/149/2007-SEZ dated July 9,2009 by the Ministry of Commerce, the State government initiative seems to be a step in the right direction, however, issues remain to be addressed like augmenting the capacity to supply power, construction of internal roads, repair of existing internal roads, construction of proper  drainage and sewerage, provision of telecommunication facilities, post-office and reinforcement of existing security fence. 

While the overall economic changes in the country has attributed to the changed perceptions and thinking, organization like NIDC( State Govt agency to promote , develop, establish and assist industries) must be supported at the same time it will be of great service if they can venture into new avenues(IT enabled services etc) whereby they can take advantage of  demographic dividend at the time, the State Government must ensure that initiatives like skill India leaves an impact upon the youths. 


Degree of Thought is a weekly community column initiated by Tetso College in partnership with The Morung Express. Degree of Thought will delve into the social, cultural, political and educational issues around us. The views expressed here do not reflect the opinion of the institution. Tetso College is a NAAC Accredited UGC recognised Commerce and Arts College. The editors are Dr Hewasa Lorin, Tatongkala Pongen, Seyiesilie Vupru and Kvulo Lorin. Portrait photographer: Rhilo Mero. For feedback or comments please email:dot@tetsocollege.org.





Tuesday, 5 June 2018

Victim Mentality - Mhabeni Tungoe, HoD, Department of Education







Mhabeni Tungoe
Are we in that category of people where every problem in our life is someone else’s fault? Or are we among the handful of people who accepts the responsibilities that comes along and tries to tackle it. Yes, it is very easy to play the blame game and remove ourselves from taking responsibility. Perhaps, instead of avoiding our responsibilities or  complaining and making excuses, accepting it will enable us to lead a more contented life and definitely make a difference in the society.



"Victim Mentality "



In life, we experience moments of joy, happiness, sorrow, and sadness. All these emotions are the elements of life. Likewise, issues and difficulties arise in all fields of human society. At present in Naga society there are certain concerns  and issues, that needs to be addressed  whether be it in the field of economic, political, social, personal, workplace  etc. It is unfortunate but quite evident that   majority of the people in the society tends to blame each other and does not take responsibility if some problem arises in our social system. There are only a few individuals who are ready to take charge and not try to find faults in others but instead try to solve the problems.  Instead of blaming one another how good it will be if we take the responsibility for the actions and deeds we have done and rectify the errors and improve our society and ourselves as well. As  parents, children, students, leaders, and citizens of Nagaland we need to be responsible for overcoming the dilemma of life. I feel that being responsible is the most important guiding principle and the core of life. It should be inculcated and instilled in every individual beginning from home environment. 
Being responsible means being reliable, keeping our words and fulfilling our commitments. It means accepting what we do and say and willing to face the consequences. Those people who have a sense of   responsibility   do not make excuses for their actions or blame others when things go wrong. Being responsible also means developing our inner potentials. Every move we take towards being responsible and productive helps us to raise our self-esteem and improve relationships with our family, friends, and co-workers. Taking up our responsibilities seriously can help us to live a less stressful life and gain the respect of others. I would like to share one poem which is written by Charles Osgood, which reflect the aspects of irresponsibility and blaming each other -

“The Responsibility poem”-Charles Osgood
There was a most important job that needed to be done, 
and no reason not to do it, there was absolutely none.
But in vital matters such as this, the thing you have to ask
is who exactly will it be who’ll carry out the task?
Anybody could have told you that everybody knew
that this was something somebody would surely have to do.
Nobody was unwilling; anybody had the ability.
But nobody believed that it was their responsibility.
It seemed to be a job that anybody could have done, 
if anybody thought he was supposed to be the one.
But since everybody recognized that anybody could, 
everybody took for granted that somebody would.
But nobody told anybody that we are aware of, 
that he would be in charge of seeing it was taken care of.
And nobody took it upon himself to follow through, 
and do what everybody thought that somebody would do.
When what Everybody needed so did not get done at all,
Everybody was complaining that Somebody dropped the ball.
Anybody then could see it was an awful crying shame,
And Everybody looked around for Somebody to blame.
Somebody should have done the job and everybody should have but in the end, nobody did what anybody could have.

Life gives us choices. Whatever we do, we are the one who chose that path of life. There are people who take complete responsibility for their experience and circumstances and these people are the ones who are able to make the right choices in life as they understand that they are responsible for their choices. However, there are some few people who are irresponsible and keep on blaming others for their choices as well as issues that occur in the society. For instances, if we don't like our job it is not the fault of the boss, or if we are unhappy in a relationship it is not the fault of the other person. We should never blame each other. When we want to blame our leaders for political, economic, and social problems; Or when we want to blame others for corruption in the society, or when we want to judge people for being inadequate, we need to question ourselves , whether we are  being irresponsible and become a part of these problems instead of solving it?. As a human being, we make mistake but we should move on with life instead of blaming ourselves or others. Because, if we blame others it means we are not going to change or improve and we will remain stagnate without improving in life. In any personal or professional relationship, it takes discipline, commitment, and hard work to achieve success. Let’s be more responsible and allow others the same freedom so that we will be rewarded with more happiness and joy. 

We may think that life is sometimes not fair at all. We all faces challenges and learn lessons in life and   while we are down with all the challenges life throws at us, we see that others are doing better than us and living a much easier life. However, we should not be discouraged in this kind of situations. Instead, we need to take life positively because we are responsible for our life. Negativity creates dissatisfactions which hinder our goals and objectives in life. When we become responsible in every aspect of life, we become a giver, rather than a taker. In return, it can create a profound positive impact on the society. The reason why our society/personal life tends to stagnate in development and growth may be because we fear of taking responsibility on issues concerning us and the world. Therefore, let’s all be responsible and play our own role and empower humanity.




Degree of Thought is a weekly community column initiated by Tetso College in partnership with The Morung Express. Degree of Thought will delve into the social, cultural, political and educational issues around us. The views expressed here do not reflect the opinion of the institution. Tetso College is a NAAC Accredited UGC recognised Commerce and Arts College. The editors are Dr Hewasa Lorin, Tatongkala Pongen, Seyiesilie Vupru and Kvulo Lorin. Portrait photographer: Rhilo Mero. For feedback or comments please email:dot@tetsocollege.org.

Wednesday, 30 May 2018

World No Tobacco Day





World No Tobacco Day



World No Tobacco Day is being observed on 31st May 2018 around the globe. The theme for this year “A Threat to Development”, addresses the urgent need to promote health and development more, including tightening tobacco control. Consumption of tobacco creates potential risk for development of coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, lung diseases and cancer.

Hindustan Times reported in June 2017 that tobacco consumption in India is the highest in the six north-eastern states of Mizoram, Meghalaya, Manipur, Nagaland, Tripura and Assam. According to the National Family Health Survey 2015-16 (NFHS-4) on average, 70.7% men here use tobacco in some form or the other. In Nagaland 69.4% of  tobacco users are male, whereas 37.7% is the female average for tobacco users in Manipur, Tripura, Meghalaya and Nagaland, which was way above the national average of 6.8%.

If you’re a tobacco consumer, it is never too late to stop now. People of all ages have benefitted from quitting. These facts below are based on a report from the World Health Organisation (WHO):

      At about 30: gain almost 10 years of life expectancy.
      At about 40: gain 9 years of life expectancy.
      At about 50: gain 6 years of life expectancy.
      At about 60: gain 3 years of life expectancy.
      After the onset of life-threatening disease: rapid benefit, people who quit smoking after having a heart attack reduce their chances of having another heart attack by 50%.
According to Dr. C Tetseo, the District Nodal Officer of Dimapur’s National Tobacco Control Programme, some of the major challenges faced to combat the problem is the sheer lack of political will to implement tobacco control laws, lack of awareness among people in the rural areas, and amongst institutions there is poor response from the government schools. He also expressed that the social acceptance of tobacco habit is quite high, and impressed upon the need for the churches to take up a greater role in this.

We also wanted to hear the youth’s take on this, and so we asked some questions to a few of our freshers and seniors at Tetso College. Here’s what they had to say:


Benrithung Junglio, HSSLC (Arts) Rank 1, Don Bosco Higher Secondary School, Wokha

“I feel that teenagers like eating tobacco, mostly because it makes them feel more mature.
As for me, I am a Christian so I want to stay away from it. It is also mentioned in the Bible that the body is a temple and so we must keep our body clean.”




Akuminla Pongentsur, HSSLC(Arts) Rank 6, Great Commission Higher Secondary School, Dimapur

“There are many youngsters who consume tobacco. I guess they take tobacco because of their friends’ influence and they also think it’s cool, and then it ends up becoming a habit. Parents never even know their children are consuming it.

I feel that shops should not sell it to kids wearing uniform. Shops must not sell it especially if they are located nearby schools.”


Ria Jain, HSSLC (Com) Rank 10, Christian Higher Secondary School, Dimapur

“I think nowadays consumption amongst high school and higher secondary students is rapidly increasing. Schools and colleges should help prevent it. They should have more seminars about the harmful effects of tobacco, provide guidance and encouragement to help those who consume it stop.
Bad  influence from friends could be one of the major reasons for starting, after which they just get addicted to it.”


Cynthia Zeuzeule, HSSLC (Arts) Rank 2, Don Bosco Higher Secondary School, Dimapur

“I feel that everyone is already aware that tobacco is harmful but I don’t know why they still take it. I really feel awful for them, because despite knowing it can kill one, they still continue consuming it. Despite restrictions and awareness being done by schools, they just don’t get it.

I think they consume it to try to look more cool and it makes them feel like they are more grown up. ”

Ratna, HSSLC (Com) Rank 7, Pranab Vidyapith Higher Secondary School, Dimapur

“I don’t have any friends who consume tobacco, but I’ve seen a lot of people around me take it. 
There are many shops around schools, and so we must tell the shopkeepers not to sell tobacco to the students. Constant checking is also required in institutions.”




Albert Sangtam, General Secretary, Tetso Student Council

Sharing his thoughts on how to prevent consumption of tobacco amongst the youth:

“Engagement in different co-curricular activities and social activities may steer away and distract one’s intentions or urge to consume tobacco. Maybe this will help prevent them from developing these bad habits.”



Lituna Jimo, Asst. General Secretary, Tetso Student Council

“Regular poster campaigns, seminars and setting up of no tobacco zones across all schools, colleges and public places is necessary. One cannot be forced to give up on tobacco, but also it’s not impossible to make someone understand. If a person is made to understand the right way and also about what one is doing to his/her body, then hopefully they will realise and change their ways.”





Degree of Thought is a weekly community column initiated by Tetso College in partnership with The Morung Express. Degree of Thought will delve into the social, cultural, political and educational issues around us. The views expressed here do not reflect the opinion of the institution. Tetso College is a NAAC Accredited UGC recognised Commerce and Arts College. The editors are Dr Hewasa Lorin, Tatongkala Pongen, Seyiesilie Vupru and Kvulo Lorin. Portrait photographer: Rhilo Mero. For feedback or comments please email:dot@tetsocollege.org.

Tuesday, 22 May 2018

Why Go Anywhere Else? - Kvulo Lorin, Director, Tetso College







Do we still need to go out of Nagaland to get quality education? Nagaland is fast turning into an education hub, where students can get quality education right here from schools, colleges and universities that are trying their absolute best to compete globally. Apart from that, certain conditions also need to be in place to set the right balance for students to want to pursue their studies at the home front, and that’s where all industries and professions come in to synergise everything together. 






Why Go Anywhere Else?



I remember when I got my HSLC result. I was excited, nervous and wondering what I would do next. One thing I was sure of though was that I didn’t want to continue my studies in Nagaland. Studying out of Nagaland seemed to hold so much glamour and I felt I was now a big boy and wanted to be free from the everyday control of my parents. So, I went off to Shillong and joined St Edmunds College but quickly felt I didn’t like it, rushed off to Bangalore for further studies, and then landed up in Hyderabad to finally end up here in Dimapur after completing all my studies. Without a doubt, I had a fantastic experience and exposure in studying and working beyond our state. And I am sure there are many more who will be following my restless footsteps in pursuit of a degree, career or maybe just for fun.


My elders love to tell their story of how they struggled to go to school. Many of them had no choice but to go to Kohima, Shillong and beyond. But, I think times are changing now. I think Nagaland is turning into an education hub. I think we are reaching a situation where students can get quality education right here in Nagaland, be it schools, colleges or universities.


Today, do we still need to go out of Nagaland to get quality education? There are both pros and cons for this. On the one hand, there is fantastic infrastructure, meeting top students of other states and an experience and exposure of a new location and way of life. There are also more specialised courses and experts to learn from and even employment opportunities. On the other hand, are our young students mature enough when they venture out at class 11 or for their Undergraduate education? Can they make the right decisions and avoid the temptations that come with the freedom of being away from home? Many students do succeed but I think many more fail.


That being said, not every institute in the famed metros of India is fantastic and not every place is an ideal place to learn for everyone. So, if someone is going to study beyond Nagaland then they should aim for the top institutes and not go blindly. But if they are not studying in a top institute, they might probably be better off studying right here in Nagaland and venturing out only when they get into the institute of their choice.


Nagaland has a lot of schools affiliated to both National Boards and the state board. We have a top central engineering university in Dimapur district with the National Institute of Technology and our very own Nagaland University is ranked 195 in the country. Many colleges in Nagaland are accredited under the National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) and we have a lot of qualified people to teach our students as compared to the past. There would be nothing better for the economy, employment and for industry if Nagaland became the education hub of choice. An education hub, not just for our students but for students all over the country and even the world.
But for Nagaland to be an education hub, it isn’t enough for a few institutes to do well. It needs many good institutes starting from schools, to colleges and universities. It would also need a city and state that is attractive enough to excite people into visiting and coming here and maybe even calling Nagaland home. It isn’t just about the students, Nagaland needs to be safe, interesting enough for top faculty and talent to want to come and do research and work here. Students graduating eventually need to find work, whether in Nagaland or beyond. The main advantage of studying in the metros is probably the job opportunities available after graduating and the plethora of options. In that sense, industry and education are always intrinsically linked.


That being said, it would be wonderful to have students from all over the country and even abroad coming to Nagaland because of the quality of our education and the quality of life our state has to offer. Then, maybe instead of going off to the metros and other places searching for education and jobs, we could have others come here for the same.


I know a student from Tetso College who studied her entire life from Nagaland right from school all the way through college and completed her BCom under Nagaland University. She got a scholarship to an Australian university to pursue her MBA with her course fees taken care of. I think this is proof that you do not need to study in Delhi or go to Shillong to study abroad. You can do it right from Nagaland, and be in a position to compete with other international students.


So, with the NBSE exam results just declared and the hectic hunt for admissions going on now, for all the 14335 HSLC students, 8325 HSSLC arts students, 1003 HSSLC commerce students and 2179 HSSLC Science Students, if you are going to study beyond and take up a course, do it for the right reasons. Or, why go anywhere else? 




Degree of Thought is a weekly community column initiated by Tetso College in partnership with The Morung Express. Degree of Thought will delve into the social, cultural, political and educational issues around us. The views expressed here do not reflect the opinion of the institution. Tetso College is a NAAC Accredited UGC recognised Commerce and Arts College. The editors are Dr Hewasa Lorin, Tatongkala Pongen, Seyiesilie Vupru, Vikono Krose and Kvulo Lorin. Portrait photographer: Rhilo Mero. For feedback or comments please email:dot@tetsocollege.org.

Wednesday, 16 May 2018

Where Will You Study Next? - Kahor Raleng, Head of the English Department & Higher Secondary Supervisor







The hunt for admissions is on, with only a few days left to the countdown of the NBSE HSLC & HSSLC result declaration. What’s interesting is how over the years, certain trends and factors have developed to reveal how students are influenced to choose their course and place of study. Read on to find out how to narrow down your choices better by avoiding some pitfalls of taking admission based only on friends, parental pressure, or marks secured, and ask yourself if it’s what YOU really want for yourself.

Where Will You Study Next?



The next hurdle after exams for students and their parents/guardians is the process of finding the right institute, and the challenges associated with it. One should remember that the decisions taken now will determine one’s future. Every year thousands of students pass their HSLC and HSSLC in Nagaland. Out of these thousands, a few hundreds decide the further course of their higher education, depending on their goals and aims. The rest just go with the flow of things which are subject to the marks scored, convenience of transport, peer pressure, etc. So, how does one look out for the right Institute, course or subject?
From the trends observed, I would like to highlight some points that I believe need to be addressed. Let me categorise the admission seekers into five groups for better understanding.

  • Students who depend on the marks secured:  A significant number of students belong to this category.  At the class 11 level most of the students opt for a stream (Arts,  Commerce or Science) depending on the marks scored in class 10 exam. This trend is followed in the undergraduate level as well. For instance, if a student secured the highest marks in English, this subject automatically becomes the first choice for honours, regardless of whether the student is passionate about the subject. Very often, in these cases, a student either drops out in the 1st semester or drags on through the other semesters by performing poorly. A student should opt for a subject or stream that interests them. Decisions should not be influenced by the subject that has a few extra marks. While selecting the stream or course one should always keep in mind one’s interest and capacity.  A student may have distinction in Science but may be interested in Arts subjects. A student may take up Arts but maybe good in Science or Commerce or vice versa.


  • Students who are influenced by peer pressure: They choose an Institute or stream because of their friends. These group of students should remember that an Institute may not be conducive to them though it is for their friends. Choosing the right Institute matters: an Institute that can provide your specific needs. I have encountered students who were dropped from good institutes due to poor performance but had secured more than 60% after changing the Institute.  


  • Students who fall under parental pressure:  Parental pressure can be immense, thus,  parents need to be careful while taking decisions for the child. Parents usually take decisions based either on the reputation of the institute, the convenience of transport and distance or living expenses. While taking this important decision parents should always take into account the capacity and consent of the child or it may affect the development and performance of the child. The decisions should align with the goals and aims of the child. The child also needs to understand the parent's point of view.


  • Students who seek admission in a certain School or College because they did not get admission elsewhere:  For these group of students, if they are hardworking, it may work out well with them. In the past, there have been students who had very low percentage in HSLC or HSSLC but have done exceptionally well. This may be because they join with low expectations, but the institute exceeded their expectations which motivated them to do well.  


  • Students for whom the School/College is their first choice: Normally, these group of students are well informed and have knowledge about the Institute. They have researched well before seeking admission. They know what they want and where they will get it. They adjust easily and are happy to be a part of the institute. Their goals are set and they are ready to fulfill their dreams. This, I should say,  are the ideal admission seekers.


The process of finding the right Institute and choosing the right stream is not easy. Many individuals cannot attain their full potential or explore possibilities because they made the wrong choice. Goals and aims can be established along the way if an individual takes the right course. Admission counseling is essential as it provides an overview of the Institute, courses offered and criteria for admission. It may also open new avenues and opportunities and provide information on scholarships. While seeking admission, some other important points need to be kept in mind. The Institute should be a recognised Institute. It should be affiliated to a governing body and accredited. There are several institutes to cater to the needs of different types of students.  All it takes to find the right one is to do some research and consult with experts in the field.



Degree of Thought is a weekly community column initiated by Tetso College in partnership with The Morung Express. Degree of Thought will delve into the social, cultural, political and educational issues around us. The views expressed here do not reflect the opinion of the institution. Tetso College is a NAAC Accredited UGC recognised Commerce and Arts College. The editors are Dr Hewasa Lorin, Tatongkala Pongen, Seyiesilie Vupru, Vikono Krose and Kvulo Lorin. Portrait photographer: Rhilo Mero. For feedback or comments please email:dot@tetsocollege.org.

Wednesday, 9 May 2018

Can we call Ourselves Responsible Naga Citizens? -Somungla Khamrang, Assistant Professor, Department of Education









Nagas are no less when it comes to coping up with the rest of the world in terms of using the latest gadgets, dressing up in the most fashionable clothes, driving the newest cars; or for that matter even in the field of education. We have come a long way. However, have all these actually made us become responsible citizens?




Can we call Ourselves Responsible Naga Citizens?


I would like to share my concerns and observations of the life and environment in general in Nagaland. Not to begin this piece by painting such a bleak picture of Nagaland nor is it to generalise people, but I’d like to offload some frustrations and observations here, in the belief that knowing our shortcomings is the first step to correcting ourselves.


Many people in Nagaland our land seem to are have become increasingly selfish. They enjoy adulation and love to be praised where there is actually no worthy or deserving space for it. Many people run after name and fame, while striving for fellow human attention. It is very upsetting to see the absence of discipline among many fellow Naga people. With the advancement of technology, people in our land are trying to cope up with the rest of the world and yet, sadly the quality of will and mind are still bounded and untouched, confined to living in a primitive shell. The latest gadgets, swanky,fashionable cars, sharp, suits and fine dress appear attractive. However, the whole gorgeous facade is diluted by insensible chaotic action, indiscipline and selfishness. For instance, we find the best dressed men in suits driving fashionable cars, smartly violating traffic rules. Many young careless people ride their smart bikes without having any sense of social concern. They modify their vehicles for louder sounding exhaust systems to get the attention of the people, while disturbing the residents and general public. Many educated and well-off people become irresponsible citizens without a care for other fellow drivers who are also stuck in the same traffic congestion, yet these people still try and and squeeze into the little space they can find to get ahead of the long line, and break the traffic rules. Our city is bothered by the insensitive restless drivers and haphazard management of the traffic authorities. Honking of vehicles is one of the most irritating and noise polluting means in our city. Despite the fact that they are aware of the tight and congested traffic which is immovable in the queue, they honk incessantly. The habit of rushing in the highway and, illegally overtaking others, despite the deplorable road condition is another  poor habit of the drivers. All these create a very risky environment for the pedestrians as well as the nearby settlers. From the level of the ministers and bureaucrats to the taxi drivers and lay men, rushing and running all day  through every available opening or space, no matter how constricted, in the highway is a culture in our land. Nonetheless, nobody reaches their destination early. It will be very beautiful on our part to at least have a sense of responsibility in the public space while we are driving.  I believe giving way to those people waiting to cross the road or to park their car in the main road won’t delay us for too long.  We should be more considerate towards one another, respect each other’s right and balance  our privileges to make the situation smooth and friendly. Generally, people are losing the capacity of patience and to compromise personal interest for other people’s interest.


Most of the drivers in our land need to be educated on proper usage of their vehicles with traffic signals, dipper at night, fog light, hazard signs and other modalities. Fancy and expensive cars which are driven by the supposedly “cultured people” have a very bright and sharp ray of high beams, which blind those travelling and affecting their safety. Surprisingly, it is these “cultured people” who have the least sense of respect for the welfare of others. This is how they in a way become responsible for many night road accidents. To prevent any untoward accidents on the road, the State and District transport authority as well as the traffic controlling authority must check and regulate the proper rules with necessary measures to keep the traffic system safe and smooth. I believe that the Indian law under the Motor Vehicle Act and other related Acts provided for preventing and safeguarding the roads and citizens must be sincerely adhered and implemented in our state.


It is my belief that we can be compliant and regulate these offences only when we have a clear conscience and pure intentions through a spirit of appreciation and reverence. Understanding and valuing the social fabric and accommodating public responsibility in this swiftly transforming society is urgently required.  The nature of human free will and independence of thought creates numerous patterns of types of human behaviour. The educated and civilized human being is generally expected to be more congenial and approachable, and it must be so.  However, the standard of the general populace are found in contrary and is failing in what it should be. It is despairing that every human today witnesses the degradation of credibility, depletion of morality, overlooking respect and negligence of moral responsibility, detachment from spirituality, ridiculed uprightness and human feelings, dishonesty, and so forth. With the advancement of systems, techniques and trend in the existing society, we are supposed to advance in our propensity too. But the present generation has a unique standard of advancement, a standard of un-correctable, hypocrisy, petty mind and selfish temperament; unwilling to listen for change and improvement. Seeing the progressive yet detrimental human behaviour in and around us, it provokes and annoys the very peaceful manner of many citizens. Keeping in mind the decent moral liberality and exceptional sociability of our forefathers, the present Naga people have emerged like descendants of another race with a different social set up. 




Degree of Thought is a weekly community column initiated by Tetso College in partnership with The Morung Express. Degree of Thought will delve into the social, cultural, political and educational issues around us. The views expressed here do not reflect the opinion of the institution. Tetso College is a NAAC Accredited UGC recognised Commerce and Arts College. The editors are Dr Hewasa Lorin, Tatongkala Pongen, Seyiesilie Vupru, Vikono Krose and Kvulo Lorin. Portrait photographer: Rhilo Mero. For feedback or comments please email:dot@tetsocollege.org.


Tuesday, 1 May 2018

Let’s go for a Productive Vacation! - Priyanka Debnath, Assistant Professor, Department of Commerce








Vacations, regardless of the season, give us an opportunity to re-energize and refresh our minds, and also get away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. If you are still wondering what to do this summer, here are a few tips to help make your vacation both fun and productive.






Let’s go for a Productive Vacation!





It’s that time of the year where all the students and teachers will be looking forward in excitement to summer vacation. Academic life can be quite stressful sometimes for the students as well as for the teachers. A break like summer vacation can help us refresh, regroup and do leisurely stuff which we really enjoy such as going for a trip, watching favorite shows or movies, playing computer or mobile games, sleeping the whole day or just staying indoors to escape the summer heat. But the question is, are we really making use of our vacation or just wasting it? Can there be a more productive way to spend our vacation? 


If you think that you are wasting your vacation and confused about how to spend it in a productive manner here are some ideas to help you decide. Serving the society: All of us want to serve the society one way or the other. So, this vacation why not give it a try? Gather some friends and take up an initiative to clean your nearby parks or public garden or marketplace etc.Volunteer at a retirement or old age home and shower them with love and affection. Another one is to volunteer for a church or temple or a mosque. Try visiting a blind home and read to them. By doing these activities you will not only serve the society but you will also get a sense of self-satisfaction and blessing from others.


Protecting earth:  Spend your vacation trying to save planet earth by planting trees in your locality. Or take a bicycle trip with friends to your city and spread awareness about the benefits of bicycles instead of other automobiles. You can start a compost in your locality by collecting fruits and vegetable waste from the neighbourhood to promote organic farming. From the above activities, you can become a face of change and play your part in protecting the planet earth.


Developing skills: Use your vacation to brush up on skills by learning a new language you always wanted to. Learn to play a new instrument, a new dance form, a new technology, driving, swimming etc. Take up a class on self-grooming and develop communication skills etc. There’s also cooking classes or self taught cooking recipes and videos to experiment with in your kitchen.  In this way, you not only learn a new thing but you can also make your resume strong.


Achieve personal goals: Throughout the year you are so caught up with work and classes that you cannot concentrate on your personal life. Why not spend your vacation achieving certain personal goals. . If you love travelling, take a trip somewhere you always wanted to go. For avid readers, think about forming a book club. If you like writing, start up a blog and share them online. You can also ease some of your stress with the help of yoga, meditation or a day at the spa. In addition, you can always use your vacation time to reconnect with family members, relatives or distant friends.


Find yourself: During vacation find time to figure out what your passion is. Think about your strengths and your weaknesses. You can even spend the summer finding your long-term goals and create a road-map on how to achieve them. For students who are still confused about what you want to do with your life, do some research on the various prospects that are available for you. For example, if you want to pursue your further studies then what are the best institutes for that particular course you want to take or what are the various alternatives if you want to discontinue and try something else.


Earn pocket money: If you are a college student, you can get an internship for a month in some companies where you can learn practical work as well as earn some money. And since no one can know your city better than you, this summer, you can also become a tour guide in your own city. Help tourists and visitors explore your city in its depth and earn some bucks at the same time. Or you can take a summer job at a mall, restaurant, showroom etc. and get some work experience to add on to your resume.


There is a quote by John Battelle, “As you grow older, you learn a few things. One of them is to actually take the time you’ve allotted for vacation”, which means we all have our daily schedules planned out for us, but vacation is a time we should take out of our monotonous life so as to make our daily lives more exciting. This summer spend your vacation in such a way that after your return to normal life you can tell yourself that ‘it was well worth it’.



Degree of Thought is a weekly community column initiated by Tetso College in partnership with The Morung Express. Degree of Thought will delve into the social, cultural, political and educational issues around us. The views expressed here do not reflect the opinion of the institution. Tetso College is a NAAC Accredited UGC recognised Commerce and Arts College. The editors are Dr Hewasa Lorin, Tatongkala Pongen, Seyiesilie Vupru, Vikono Krose and Kvulo Lorin. Portrait photographer: Rhilo Mero. For feedback or comments please email:dot@tetsocollege.org.

Special Economic Zone: Myth and Reality - Supongtemsu Longchar, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science

As a Special Economic Zone, can Nagaland upgrade its existing infrastructure to not only utilize to its maximum capacity, but at ...